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1 hour ago, fordmantpw said:

Good grief guys!  This thing is a low-revving, slow-running truck engine.  Anything beyond that is pushing it beyond it's design objective and it's likely going to be a shitty outcome unless you spend tons of money reworking a lot of things.

It's a TRUCK ENGINE! Geez!

How many 460 engines did you see in cars?  Or the F150 for that matter?

My parents had 2 Lincolns with 460s and I had a Galaxie Sport Roof with a 429.  GM put 454's in half tons, our neighbor had one.

Briggs and Strattons mow lawns AND power go-carts on race tracks.

It'a low revving truck engine because that's what Ford TUNED it for not because all 7.3's are low revving.

People take 6.0 LS's out of trucks and throw cams, heads, intakes, etc at them every day. Why do you think SEMA exists?

If people want to hot rod the 7.3 they'll do whether you like it or not.

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1 hour ago, MY93SHO said:

It'a low revving truck engine because that's what Ford TUNED it for not because all 7.3's are low revving.

It's a low-revving truck engine because that's what it was designed to be. Listen to the engineers who designed it--they intentionally traded off high revving because it wasn't useful for the targeted usage. They needed an engine that would run under a near-constant load in a relatively constrained RPM range, so that's what they designed the engine to do

IMHO, trying to make it a hot rod engine for a Mustang is like trying to make a half-ton truck engine out of the old Ford 3-cylinder tractor diesel. Yeah, you might be able to do it, but that doesn't mean that it makes any sense; as was pointed out above, there are much better starting points if you want Ford big block performance.

FWIW, I'm sure someone will do it as a one-off just because they can (I wouldn't be shocked to see someone like Chip Foose do something like that for a SEMA car just for the hell of it), and that's certainly cool, but Ford won't put it in anything that didn't get the V-10, which means there won't be enough volume to draw aftermarket support, which means it'll be relegated to the land of one-offs.

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Am I the only old fart around here? the 460 was the replacement for the old 462 MEL in the Lincoln in 68. A luxury car engine. The 429 was the Ford version that started out in the TBird in 68. The 429 then spread through the Ford lineup and the 460 spread to Mercury. Sometime around 73 the 460 showed up in Fords ( I drove a 75 Country Squire with a 460). Then in the mid to late 70's the 460 showed up in pickups (a friend had one in a 78 F350). So an engine can be adapted to various uses, hey there was an HD version of the 429 (along with the 370) in medium trucks. Now, do I expect Ford to expand the 7.3 to cars? No

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1 hour ago, lfeg said:

Am I the only old fart around here? the 460 was the replacement for the old 462 MEL in the Lincoln in 68. A luxury car engine. The 429 was the Ford version that started out in the TBird in 68. The 429 then spread through the Ford lineup and the 460 spread to Mercury. Sometime around 73 the 460 showed up in Fords ( I drove a 75 Country Squire with a 460). Then in the mid to late 70's the 460 showed up in pickups (a friend had one in a 78 F350). So an engine can be adapted to various uses, hey there was an HD version of the 429 (along with the 370) in medium trucks. Now, do I expect Ford to expand the 7.3 to cars? No

My dad had a 1974 LTD Brougham with a 460 in it....that car passed everything on the road except a gas station. But to say a 429, a 460, and a 370 are designed the same would be a misnomer. Yes, all were 385 series engine based, but each were "re-vamped" significantly for their specific "mission". I agree with your assessment that your will likely never see a factory install of a 7.3L in a car (skunk work "one offs" excluded). Personally, a CD6 Lincoln Continental powered by a 7.3L would certainly raise a lot of eyebrows though, but that is just my devious automotive tinged mind working overtime...lol

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4 minutes ago, twintornados said:

My dad had a 1974 LTD Brougham with a 460 in it....that car passed everything on the road except a gas station. But to say a 429, a 460, and a 370 are designed the same would be a misnomer. Yes, all were 385 series engine based, but each were "re-vamped" significantly for their specific "mission". I agree with your assessment that your will likely never see a factory install of a 7.3L in a car (skunk work "one offs" excluded). Personally, a CD6 Lincoln Continental powered by a 7.3L would certainly raise a lot of eyebrows though, but that is just my devious automotive tinged mind working overtime...lol

Right, even the 429 2v in a Galaxie was different from the 429SCJ which was different from the 429HD. Same basic block but different cranks, pistons, manifolds, etc to suit the application. When Ford designed the 385 series engine they covered many bases.

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To Ifeg

Your not the only old guy here! I’m 70 years old and worked at Ford Engine division between 1968 and 1975 first as a test car driver and later as a product development engineer in fuel systems.

The discussion is interesting about the new 7.3 V8.

With enough money, you can do almost anything but you must make a profit when your done or you will be done in by the market!

I do remember the 1968 thunderbird 429 as the first application of the 385 series.  It was not any faster than the 428 but used more gas!

The absolute best street engine in that time was the 428 cobra jet. It could burn rubber from 0 all the way up to 113 mph. The 460 never did anything but move very large cars and motor homes. Volume on F250/350 was very low.

From what I remember the Chevy 348 was designed as a truck engine. It became the 409 which always beat our 406 FE V8 on the street.

So a truck engine can become a performance engine with the right cam, cylinder heads and fuel system.

The 6.2 can be bored and stroked to 7.0 liters. putting displacement on demand on it is more costly to do than on a push rod engine like the 7.3.

edselford

 

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And why would Ford bother when the supercharged 5.2 is already developed to cater for high performance applications
I see potential for the 7.3 in stationary equipment like generators and pumps replacing the 6.8 but we could see it as
a Ford Racing engine available for off road sale.

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15 hours ago, fordmantpw said:

 

How many 460 engines did you see in cars?  Or the F150 for that matter?

Mid 70s Thunderbird and Lincolns.

But to your point, that was about moving very heavy cars. Not necessarily speed.

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5 hours ago, jpd80 said:

And why would Ford bother when the supercharged 5.2 is already developed to cater for high performance applications
I see potential for the 7.3 in stationary equipment like generators and pumps replacing the 6.8 but we could see it as
a Ford Racing engine available for off road sale.

Ford Performance doesn't even offer the 6.2, so I wouldn't be holding my breath on the 7.3. 

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Keep in mind guys, that the 460 was handicapped by Ford abandoning racing in mid 1970. Fortunately, the 429 was somewhat developed.

 

We have a 78 year model 460 out of an F-250 bored & stroked to 513 cubes. It will spin 6000 rpm almost all day and makes 600 hp without power adders.

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This engine is going to be something regardless of what the doubters think. 

If hot rodders weren’t willing to blaze a trail the Flathead Ford would have been a mere footnote in automobile history. Instead it’s the cornerstone of hot rodding!

The Flathead Ford has 3 mains, 4 ring pistons and limited breathing yet there it is, still a favorite of traditional crowd. 

A big inch pushrod V8 with a sturdy block and descent cylinder heads will be hot rodded regardless of what anyone thinks. 

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10 hours ago, Stray Kat said:

A big inch pushrod V8 with a sturdy block and descent cylinder heads will be hot rodded regardless of what anyone thinks. 

No one is doubting that part...just don't expect it to show in from the factory in any Ford cars....

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99% of 429/460 engines use the same exact heads for their year.
CJ/SCJ, Boss429 (block and heads different), and Police Interceptor are the exceptions.

460 was available in F100-F350 in 2 wheel drive models 73-79 and was the same engine available in the cars of the same year. 460 was always 4bbl. some 429 were 2bbl.

We regularly build 460s in the 450hp/550tq range on regular ol' cast iron d3ve or d0ve heads (trucks and passenger cars).

Granted we aren't concerned about emissions or fuel economy (though we do average 12-14 out of the 460s we build)... but to say a big cube engine can't be made into a performance engine because it was designed for trucks is pretty silly. You're likely a cam and spring package away from some pretty healthy numbers and rpm with this thing.

All that said, it's not going to happen from the factory with coyote around.

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9 minutes ago, Captainp4 said:

All that said, it's not going to happen from the factory with coyote around.

That was really my point.  If you were going to build this for high HP in a car, wouldn't it be a helluva lot easier to start with the Coyote as opposed to a big, heavy, truck engine?

If you were going to look for a marathon runner for your marathon team, would you start looking for a body builder who can bench press a small car?

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Just now, fordmantpw said:

That was really my point.  If you were going to build this for high HP in a car, wouldn't it be a helluva lot easier to start with the Coyote as opposed to a big, heavy, truck engine?

If you were going to look for a marathon runner for your marathon team, would you start looking for a body builder who can bench press a small car?


Depends if you're trying to turn or not I guess lol. This engine might make sense to the 1/4 mile guys if there ends up being any aftermarket support. I do agree coyote will be better in most circumstances though.

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On 8/11/2019 at 8:51 AM, SoonerLS said:

Ford Performance doesn't even offer the 6.2, so I wouldn't be holding my breath on the 7.3. 

It was only a suggestion that the only way we’d see a 7.3 outside of a  truck would be the applications I mentioned, the 7.3 might be a way of retiring the big Windsor 460 or not.....

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@evanjsmith wrote...Yes, it fits! First look at a 7.3L Godzilla in a Foxbody. At 445 cubic inches, is this the next LS killer we’ve all been waiting for? Stay tuned for more on this swap, including info on the install kit. Video coming soon on my YouTube: search REVan Evan and please Subscribe. _______________ #godzilla #revanevan #superduty#foxbody #ford #fox #stang #revanmedia#evanjsmithphoto #stanglife #moretocome #fordtrucks#engineswap #nols #coyote

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Beat me to it. Evan Smith has already started swapping one before its even released to the public. Tell me Ford isn't behind the scenes on this one? That fits in there as easy as the Windsor in my own FoxBody.

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21 minutes ago, dave91gt said:

Beat me to it. Evan Smith has already started swapping one before its even released to the public. Tell me Ford isn't behind the scenes on this one? That fits in there as easy as the Windsor in my own FoxBody.

There’s quite a few Foxbodies running around with Coyotes under the hood, so fitting the 7.3 shouldn’t be hard. 

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Ford probably commissioned that Foxbody swap car for this year's SEMA show. If it is there, it will be a sign that the 7.3L will get aftermarket support.

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Why would you want to do this when you can get 700+ from a base coyote with an easy bolt on supercharger?  Just to prove it can be done?

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3 minutes ago, akirby said:

Why would you want to do this when you can get 700+ from a base coyote with an easy bolt on supercharger?  Just to prove it can be done?

Short answer, yes. If you look at the pictures, that fits a lot easier than a coyote. You can supercharge a 7.3 too.

Why shouldn't people experiment and push the envelope? Sometimes doing the same thing everyone else does gets boring.

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Maybe this will be a good candidate as a swap for the 390FE in the 60's large sedans.  I know a Coyote is too wide to fit between the shock towers on my old man's 61 Sunliner. 

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That 7.3 swap makes for interesting thoughts...and I already figure that "enhanced" versions will be at SEMA, so I'm sure that Ford Racing will have some toys to free up some ponies.

If they get headers and other basics figured out for popular applications, the new motor may be a real option for those that aren't all about supercharger whine.

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