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blksn8k2

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blksn8k2 last won the day on October 28 2021

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  1. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    And the larger bore of the gen 3/4 was made possible by the switch to PTWA cylinder coating in lieu of steel liners. I believe I read in some of the coverage of the 2024 Mustang that the Mustang's version of the Coyote was adopting the "bottom end" of the truck version meaning the crankcase design. They were touting the switch to a steel oil pan. I assume that also includes the belt driven oil pump but they didn't actually say that. The old crank driven oil pump design was the weak link, especially when adding forced induction. The "fix" was to replace the cast factory pump gears and housing with aftermarket billet parts. When the 2021 F-150's 5.0L was introduced the Ford engineers made a point of the fact that the new belt driven pump had been tested to withstand up to 1000 hp output.
  2. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    No offense but... no kidding. The point I was trying to make is that if you look at the overall design of not only the LS but also the GM SB2 NASCAR cup engine they look more like evolutions of Ford engines than they do the small block Chevy. Especially the cylinder head design. If anything, the SB2 is probably more similar to the Ford Cleveland head design but that has more to do with current NASCAR engine rules for cylinder head valve angles, etc.
  3. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    That was me. But as others have pointed out, the 6.8 actually uses a slightly shorter stroke than even the 6.2 Boss did (3.68" vs 3.74"). One of the things that I wondered about with the 6.2 crank was that with it being a SOHC designed if there was some special machining on the snout of the crank to accommodate the mounting of sprockets to run the camshaft for each cylinder head. That would obviously be unnecessary for a pushrod design like the Godzilla. So, if the crank couldn't be used as is without extra machining, then why not optimize the stroke for the 6.8L application? I suppose it's even possible that they are still using the same raw forging as the 6.2 but altering the machining to suit the 6.8.
  4. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    True, but it's not far from being Ford SB Windsor based....
  5. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    I suppose it's possible that the 6.8 is set up for a future switch to DI or, more likely, a dual injection design similar to what is currently used on all F-150 engines. For 2023 that is apparently not necessary yet. However, the "bowl" pistons would seem more conducive to a forced induction setup rather than DI. One of the benefits of DI is that it allows for a higher compression ratio due to the cooling effect of spraying fuel directly into the combustion chamber. As witness, the gen III Coyote has a 12:1 CR.
  6. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    Here's a little known fact from NASCAR history. Back in the late 60's NASCAR wanted to reduce the displacement of the engines so they came up with a power to weight formula which allowed teams to run a lighter car based on the reduced output of its engine. Ford's response to this new rule was to destroke their 427 FE racing engines by using the forged crankshaft from the 361 cu in truck engine. The resulting 396 was a result of using the 427's 4.23" bore and the 361's 3.5" stroke. That engine would scream to over 8000 rpm and won a lot of races in the lighter Fairlane chassis.
  7. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    I assume that was the TFL Truck video in which the Ford engineer also mentioned that customers will really like the quick revving characteristics of the new 6.8. That is at least partially due to the big bore/short stroke design.
  8. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    Perhaps the 6.8 becomes the only gas option in F-250, F-350 and E-series and the 7.3 is used only for F-450 and up?
  9. blksn8k2

    FE Race & Reunion 2022

    I was at this event on 9/10/22. It was held at Beaver Springs Dragway in central PA. All of these cars are powered by FE big blocks, mostly 427s and 428 CJs. One of the most impressive was the black falcon which made one pass of 8.55 sec @ an on the brakes 132 mph in the 1/4 mile. Who would have thought one of those old motors could do that? Enjoy the sounds of real Ford Power! Edit: The Falcon also ran an 8.20 @ 153... real
  10. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    Just to be clear, by using the 6.2 crank in the 7.3 block you get 6.8L without changing the 7.3's bore size which also means no change to piston size. The displacement formula for an engine is Area of the Bore (πr²) x Crankshaft Stroke x Number of Cylinders. So, for an engine having a 4.22" bore (7.3L block) and 3.74" stroke (6.2L crank), the calc would be (4.22"÷2)² x π x 3.74" x 8 = 418.48 cu in or 6.858L. And just to show my age, the old adage that a big bore/short stroke engine was always considered to be a quicker revving engine that made peak power at a higher rpm compared to a small bore/long stroke engine and this was best illustrated when comparing a 427 FE (big bore/short stroke) to a 428 FE (small bore/long stroke). The 427 was a better race engine when compared to a 428 which was actually a better street engine due to it's lower rpm torque output.
  11. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    I see this more along the lines of the old 385 series big blocks. The 429 and 460 shared the same bore size but used different crankshaft stroke dimensions. I also don't think we can dismiss the fact that the 6.2L Boss uses the same bore spacing and main bearing journal sizes as the 7.3L Godzilla. It would seem to be almost too easy to say you could simply use the 6.2 crank in a 7.3 block. BTW, that does result in 6.8L of displacement assuming you do not change the bore diameter of the 7.3 block. The only argument against a 6.8L in that configuration might be that big bore/short stroke engines have historically not been the best way to produce good low rpm torque which is what you would probably prefer for a truck application.
  12. blksn8k2

    The New 6.8L V8 Thread

    Still wondering if this is as simple as using the 6.2L crankshaft in the 7.3L block? They share the same bore spacing and main bearing journal size. Using the 7.3's bore size of 4.220" and the 6.2's stroke of 3.74" = 418 cu in or 6.8L. This would make for a quick revving engine similar to the old 429 ci big block.
  13. blksn8k2

    WOO at Port Royal

    No I do not and I doubt they run anything other than some type of SBC or LS based spec engine.
  14. blksn8k2

    Bronco Heritage edition

    Not a big fan of the white wheels. Look a little too utilitarian. The black with white trim rings is a bit better but I guess the aftermarket would solve either of those issues. Make Grabber Green a color option and build it in a truck version and I will be first in line. LOL.
  15. blksn8k2

    WOO at Port Royal

    World Of Outlaws update: Donny Schatz in the TSR #15 Ford won his 11th Knoxville Nationals on August 13th. https://performance.ford.com/enthusiasts/media-room/2022/8/schatz-knoxville-win.html?emailid=PRODOP1394
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