Jump to content

Amazon's Jeff Bezos approaching $1 trillion


Recommended Posts

Because nobody else has anything else to do but buy buy buy online!  Instead of doing some thinking while idle, they shop!  My postal friend says parcel volumes are almost Christmas time levels! Very sad!  And the Chinese get rewarded because everything is made there!  Like I already said elsewhere, have him and his billionaire buddies cut a check for $50 billion EACH and send it to the Treasury for redistribution to us middle class slaves!

Edited by Joe771476
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I do like amazon, they have a really nice website and service. I'm also a fan of The Boys and The Expanse on prime video.

 

That said, I have recently started to buy directly from manufacturers and traditional retailers like Crutchfield, bhphotovideo, Sonix Electronix, etc.  When you bypass amazon, more of your money goes directly to the seller. 

I still shop at amazon, but I try to support my local businesses first and then diversify my online shopping.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Here in America, you can earn and/or make as much as humanly possible, what defines you as a good citizen is how you live your life as your earnings explode...latest thing Bezos is doing is going for a joy ride on a rocket ship with his brother into space. I get the implications for the success of Blue Origin, but seriously? This smacks of a publicity stunt that just shows how vapid Mr. Bezos is....I hope I am wrong on this.

 

Lets look back in our history on some of America's most famous rich people and compare them to today's crop of self-serving Richie Rich wannabes....

Here is the first Forbes "richest persons list", you will see some famous names on it, some were a**holes, some were philanthropists and most all were remembered for what they "gave back" to ensure their legacy. Andrew Carnegie was quoted and said it best, "He who dies thus rich, dies in disgrace."

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chasewithorn/2017/09/19/the-first-forbes-list-see-who-the-richest-americans-were-in-1918/?sh=f6831824c0d2

 

 

 

 

image.thumb.png.67afd7608809b34eb4e07e8e16d6b0f1.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 6/9/2021 at 7:20 AM, twintornados said:

Here in America, you can earn and/or make as much as humanly possible, what defines you as a good citizen is how you live your life as your earnings explode...latest thing Bezos is doing is going for a joy ride on a rocket ship with his brother into space. I get the implications for the success of Blue Origin, but seriously? This smacks of a publicity stunt that just shows how vapid Mr. Bezos is....I hope I am wrong on this.

 

Lets look back in our history on some of America's most famous rich people and compare them to today's crop of self-serving Richie Rich wannabes....

Here is the first Forbes "richest persons list", you will see some famous names on it, some were a**holes, some were philanthropists and most all were remembered for what they "gave back" to ensure their legacy. Andrew Carnegie was quoted and said it best, "He who dies thus rich, dies in disgrace."

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chasewithorn/2017/09/19/the-first-forbes-list-see-who-the-richest-americans-were-in-1918/?sh=f6831824c0d2

 

 

 

 

image.thumb.png.67afd7608809b34eb4e07e8e16d6b0f1.png

 

You know that Carnegie was one of the biggest strike-breakers in history, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, LookingToBuyAFord said:

 

You know that Carnegie was one of the biggest strike-breakers in history, right?

 

And that's important because? Don't jump to conclusions because of the question. I have a degree for one of the top business colleges that has a lot of alumni from the automotive industry including Edsel Ford, a Firestone, a son of the Goodyear CEO at the time, son of the AMC CEO at the time and lots of Dealers' kids. Our campus looked like a dealership lot with all the new car demo's. My career path was untraditional in that I spent the first 15 years in the entertainment business with 8 years as the Business Agent for a major theatrical union. Just so you don't think that my question is anti-union. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, ice-capades said:

... I spent the first 15 years in the entertainment business with 8 years as the Business Agent for a major theatrical union. Just so you don't think that my question is anti-union. 

Similar sentiment here Ice...I am pro-union myself, having spent the better part of my career in State Corrections in one position in the union or another...from local rep, to regional rep and now a state-wide trustee.

Edited by twintornados
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/17/2021 at 10:26 AM, twintornados said:

 

There were a lot of them on that list....your point?

 

That's the exactly point - many of the wealthy philanthropists are actually terrible people (or cut-throat), and the philanthropy part is basically buying forgiveness for their sins.

 

We have to read in between the lines on this.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, LookingToBuyAFord said:

 

That's the exactly point - many of the wealthy philanthropists are actually terrible people (or cut-throat), and the philanthropy part is basically buying forgiveness for their sins.

 

We have to read in between the lines on this.

 

The point is, they wanted their "legacy" to be shaped by no one other than themselves, but no matter how their legacy is written, they are a far sight better than the current crop of self-serving a**hole billionaires that are around today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
  • 5 weeks later...

Looking at many of the names on the list, there are quite a few scoundrels and opportunists. Originally from Pittsburgh, have quite a few relatives who suffered directly and indirectly from activities of the steel and coal magnates. I have benefited from Carnegie libraries, Carnegie Mellon University, donations to many cultural institutions and parks as well. Later on I benefited by working for a spin off from DuPont company, and eventually Ford Motor Company. Does it all "even out" with positives and negatives? I'm sure descendants of the Homestead Strike, or Rouge River Bridge will say no. 

Of all the mega wealthy on the list, Carnegie alone had donated the bulk of his wealth by the time of his death in 1919. Carnegie family members are by no means poor, but not "filthy rich" by todays standards. Buffett and Gates have acknowledged this philosophy. Will they follow through? If Bezos gives away $10 billion per year, in 100 years, he might just do it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...
On 5/28/2020 at 10:52 AM, probowler said:

I do like amazon, they have a really nice website and service. I'm also a fan of The Boys and The Expanse on prime video.

 

That said, I have recently started to buy directly from manufacturers and traditional retailers like Crutchfield, bhphotovideo, Sonix Electronix, etc.  When you bypass amazon, more of your money goes directly to the seller. 

I still shop at amazon, but I try to support my local businesses first and then diversify my online shopping.

I don't see Amazon's competitors yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...