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jasonj80

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jasonj80 last won the day on April 26

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About jasonj80

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  1. Well Toyota has also rapidly moved everything over to TNGA to get massive economies of scale. Ford meanwhile just lets things in each vehicle kingdom carry on for extended periods of time. Ford should have just cancelled the MCE of the 2019 Edge and moved to a new one in 2020 on C2.
  2. Over time I see them continuing to invest in lower cost production sites and production closing that make parts/components that are no longer needed. Those new plants probably won't be in the U.S., here it would be repurpose of existing or addition to existing facilities. Engines/ Transmissions are one area over the next 10/15 years that will see a decrease in production and will lead to plant closings over time. While Ford will eventually need a battery facility the production there will not need the same man power as conventional vehicles and there will be maybe 2-3 world wide, and will probably be in Mexico and India. Electric cars in general need considerably fewer man hours to assembly so they will not need as many people even if a plant is the same size as before. If Ford had not cancelled San Luis Potosi there would have been a plant closings in the US/Canada. There is always the persistent roomers that Oakville, Buffalo Stamping, Woodhaven Stamping are all on the way out. Ford does have a surplus in Stamping space but the nature of the facility allows it to scale well. One of Ford's biggest mistakes they made was keeping Chicago and closing Atlanta. Atlanta was a great run plant with a great workforce. Chicago is none of that nor has been; When they both made the Taurus people that knew would tell you to get an Atlanta built car, not a Chicago car. (However, the Explorer launch was way more than just a Chicago issue, but it didn't help that it was being made there either) Tesla got stuck with that plant, at the time it was closing and they needed an assembly plant, California tossed a ton of money at them to setup shop to show they were a manufacturing friendly basically making the plant free. Every other manufacture had left California for obvious reasons. It will be interesting where Tesla ends up long term and I could see production shifting overtime abut that will be dependent on where Tesla's market share ends up over time. The existing Tesla owners I know will never go back to a gas powered car; that doesn't mean they will be with Tesla forever, 2 have MACH-E reserved, and 1 has a Rivian reserved.
  3. 150k people per month are diagnosed with cancer, there have been virtually no cancer screenings over the past 2 1/2 months, on top of creating a backlog of screenings of people. Cancer is one of many other health issues going undiagnosed or being put off which will be killing people for months to come. The fact very little of this data in reports and papers has been peer reviewed in an actual Good journal says all. Michigan isn’t even publishing the metrics state is using to reopen. Though I’m not sure anyone in the Governors or AG office actually has a clue about anything, I mean today the AG sued went against GM, FCA (and Ford some what) in the fuel economy standards, never mind they are only some of the largest employers in the state and now is launching an investigation into the dam failure when Michigan is part of the lawsuits and has some fault rather than appoint an independent investigation. This is the beginning of the next lost decade for Michigan. That will impact Ford in that it is already hard to recruit talent here, that will become even harder over the decade.
  4. jasonj80

    Hyundai Santa Fe teased

    Exactly, especially with 30%+ of people leasing, the last thing you want when you lease is up is to just release the same car. Fastest way to get a customer to walk down the street and find "something fresh" a new car should be new.
  5. jasonj80

    2021 F-150?!

    Well they need to redesign the door latch so they have some recalls in 2023 and 2024. Gets those existing customers back into the dealer to look at the new Electric F-150.
  6. No what I'm saying is that the Sport will be slightly higher than that price point, there will not be a 24K model like the Escape has.
  7. The Sport will start at $4,000-$5,000 more than a Escape, however as you go up in trim line the Sport/Escape will be less in price difference when you get to similar features. There will be no Base Sport like there is with the Escape, so the idea of a base S 2wd with no options isn't happening on the Sport. Think 4wd SE Escape, for base equipment along with some special features the Escape doesn't have . Ford is also projecting a 50/50 male/female split on the Sport where the Bronco will skew very heavy toward male buyers.
  8. That’s not just a Ford issue “I’m taking care of my kids” or “I’m scared to work” is an issue every company is coming in contact with, that plus people can make $970 a week sitting at home has given people 0 reason to go back. Now the governor is trying to deflect attention so that no one notices that her AG sued the dam owner for letting the water out of the dam that failed because there were releasing too much and it was harming that fresh water muscle so he couldn’t release it in the time prior to the failure. Just take a nice drive down to Ohio for a haircut or now dinner. The haircut felt great!
  9. Ford did look at updating the Flex and ran some business cases with moving it over to the new architectures. It just became cost prohibitive with the investment better spent on other vehicles. Example the Fusion Active can be sold in more markets than the Flex can be for the same development costs as well as meet CAFE requirements easier. It could also be made in Canada and exported to Europe so you have a more favorable exchange rate along with more favorable trade deals. The Flex never got the love from Ford after it launched like it did when it was in the design stage. The market switched rapidly after the 08-09 recession and by 2012 it was clear that market was never coming back so after the MCE it was done, the MCE really tightened the interior/exterior down, it is a huge improvement if you compare. It hung on as long as it did as they needed product for Oakville to maintain the two shifts (Edge/Nautilus is only good for about 1.5 shifts) the tooling was long paid for and the Explorer/Taurus were in production so suppliers were still building the components for it to continue on.
  10. jasonj80

    Another Ford in the driveway

    I can see why you drove Honda’s for a while.
  11. No Southfield and Enterprise, that's where the climate / drivability building is at along with Roush, Pilot is down at 94/Oakwood - which is the old Edsel Headquarters then on Enterprise north of Oakwood is the Allen Park test building.
  12. The 3rd party being one of Ford's long standing ad agency partners.
  13. The refresh rate of the DRL when the photo is taken, it is like when you take video of a vehicle with LED DRL's they will flicker in the video.
  14. Ford was in the process when Covid hit to over build F-150's and Fusions to make sure there was enough supply for when the factories were going to close for model switchovers. I know some work was done with the Covid shutdown to help shorten the model switch over but shutdowns will still be needed to complete the work.
  15. They seem to go south on 75 then come back north on 275 but that's normally because in heading north on 75 and south on 275. They also have been going in and out of Enterprise drive and Southfield in Allen Park.
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