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15 hours ago, Joe771476 said:

The dumbing down of America.  Don't train engineers have to know the height of their loads and aren't there height signs on bridges over railroad track routes like truckers do with highway bridge height signs?  Guess not!

 

The sign would have to be more than a mile before the bridge for the conductor to be able to do anything about it.  As Fuzzy mentions, this is all on the dispatcher, not the engineer.

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5 hours ago, atomcat68 said:

I am amazed that the bridge didn't fall down.

That's a railroad bridge. It's going to take a lot more than some corrugated metal to take it down.

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10 hours ago, SoonerLS said:

That's a railroad bridge. It's going to take a lot more than some corrugated metal to take it down.

And that is key point-look at structural top rails on rail cars.  Untouched.  Looks like that corrugated sheet  was self supporting  and it just caught edge of overpass by an inch or two-but that's all it took

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Ford Authority this AM had more coverage.  Much of same video but no explanation as to how this happened in this day and age.  Near Memphis.

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I'd say it was more likely there was a problem with one of the rail cars with a piece sticking up and getting caught on the bridge.

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On 9/15/2020 at 6:26 AM, atomcat68 said:

I am amazed that the bridge didn't fall down.


Some Railroad bridges have sacrificial beams in them, the train is also hitting it at the weakest part of the box car, and its just pealing off the corrugated metal. Bridged built over railroad for the past 40+ years have required 23 feet from top of rail to bottom of the bridge. 

Also with all the fresh ballast next to the train if work was recently done on the rails to possibly upgrade for more traffic; With PSR the way train are routed can be different different depending on loads, PSR will also be the death of the industry but that's a whole other conversation. 

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