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What the heck happened?!

 

Never mind - just watched the GIF.  Ouch!

Edited by MadManMoon

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ya, had some link issues... finally got it working.  Wonder how that phone call to Ford went.

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How does something like that happen on a known train route?  

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Surely there must be an easy way to convert your vehicles into convertibles.

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3 hours ago, tbone said:

How does something like that happen on a known train route?  

 

This is what I'm wondering.

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This reminds me of an anecdote I read years ago (and still haven't been able to verify)...

 

It was claimed that, sometime in the early 2010s, Ford lost more F-Series pickups to transportation accidents than Honda SOLD Ridgelines in a year.  😄

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9 hours ago, tbone said:

How does something like that happen on a known train route?  


A dispatcher somewhere along the system routed the train wrong probably 

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FCSD Exec: We HAVE TO figure out how to reduce the staggering number of warranty claims on the new Explorer.

Transport exec: I got ya boss.

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On 9/9/2020 at 8:31 AM, fuzzymoomoo said:


A dispatcher somewhere along the system routed the train wrong probably 

I would doubt that- I would have to believe bridge clearances are all a part of any dispatch sequence-plus had that been the case, you would think the train crew would have immediately reacted to a thrown switch that was taking them on a different route then they would normally run.

Again, absolutely clueless but if you look at the video, it seems to me the corrugated panels were just catching the bridge they were going under.  the corrugated sheets were then stacking up and doing the damage. Maybe the top span suffered some sort of failure and dropped a few inches???

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Coming soon, a limited run of Open Topped Explorers

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24 minutes ago, Bob Rosadini said:

I would doubt that- I would have to believe bridge clearances are all a part of any dispatch sequence-plus had that been the case, you would think the train crew would have immediately reacted to a thrown switch that was taking them on a different route then they would normally run.

Again, absolutely clueless but if you look at the video, it seems to me the corrugated panels were just catching the bridge they were going under.  the corrugated sheets were then stacking up and doing the damage. Maybe the top span suffered some sort of failure and dropped a few inches???


Never underestimate a person's ability to make a mistake. Doubly for relying on automated systems. 

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10 minutes ago, jpd80 said:

Coming soon, a limited run of Open Topped Explorers

Safari Exports😎

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7 minutes ago, fuzzymoomoo said:


Never underestimate a person's ability to make a mistake. Doubly for relying on automated systems. 

Well I just tried to do a search for " Rail accident..damaged Explorers- nothing

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On 9/8/2020 at 10:27 PM, ausrutherford said:

This is why Ford pays for insurance...

 

Ford's insurance doesn't cover this.  The transporter or whoever owns that train is who's insurance will cover it,  so this is actually a great thing for Ford.   :)

 

Ford probably didn't even own those vehicles at that point.  If these were production Explorers that left the plant as soon as they leave the plant grounds a dealer owns them.  The transport/train insurance company will pay the dealer for the Explorers, and then the dealer will pay off this unit on their floorplan and immediately order a replacement Explorer.  Again, good news for Ford.  :)

 

I remember when this happened and everyone inside Regent Court was excited.  That was 2,000 immediate re-orders we knew were coming...

 

https://www.autoweek.com/news/a2094286/lost-sea-volvo-takes-biggest-hit-wake-car-carrier-sinking/

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13 hours ago, iamweasel said:

 

Ford's insurance doesn't cover this.  The transporter or whoever owns that train is who's insurance will cover it,  so this is actually a great thing for Ford.   :)

 

Ford probably didn't even own those vehicles at that point.  If these were production Explorers that left the plant as soon as they leave the plant grounds a dealer owns them.  The transport/train insurance company will pay the dealer for the Explorers, and then the dealer will pay off this unit on their floorplan and immediately order a replacement Explorer.  Again, good news for Ford.  :)

 

The dealer doesn't have to do anything. As soon as the units are identified, Ford notifies the dealer that the units were damaged in transit and will not be available for retail sale. Vehicles damaged in a case like this are likely considered a total loss and will not be repaired and sold at auction. If the units are already in a dealer's inventory and on a Ford Credit floorplan account, Ford will remove the vehicles and credit the floorplan account. The dealer will have to place new orders to replace the lost inventory and work with their Zone Manager for additional allocation and expedited scheduling through the regional office. 

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The dumbing down of America.  Don't train engineers have to know the height of their loads and aren't there height signs on bridges over railroad track routes like truckers do with highway bridge height signs?  Guess not!

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48 minutes ago, Joe771476 said:

The dumbing down of America.  Don't train engineers have to know the height of their loads and aren't there height signs on bridges over railroad track routes like truckers do with highway bridge height signs?  Guess not!


An engineer is ultimately responsible for the train, yes but it's also up to dispatch to make sure trains are on the correct tracks.

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