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California shakes up auto industry, says all vans and trucks must be electric by 2024

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3 hours ago, akirby said:

The solution is fast public charging not putting chargers in every residence.

 

This is a 3 years old article... Cities should be installing chargers when they replace existing utilities. And they will generate revenue for the city/utility. It's not rocket science. 

 

https://electrek.co/2019/11/13/la-adds-hundreds-of-ev-chargers-to-streetlights-giving-renters-a-place-to-plug-in/

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3 hours ago, bzcat said:

 

Many multi-unit buidlings are being retrofitted with charges where I live so market forces will drive that. Smart landlords know they won't be able to charge market rent soon if they don't provide charger. Just like units with air conditioner or in-unit laundry can charge more rent - so would units with access to chargers. It seems strange to me that you don't want the tax payer to pay for charger yet you have no faith in the free market and the invisbile hand. Pick a side 😎

 

Zoning regulation is a local matter. You don't see any action where you live because your local Govt is failing at planning for the future. Here is California, any new builds require 220V outlets in parking areas and rooft top solar; and utilities have to offer net-metering. Yes, it costs money, but so does indoor plummbing and insulation which are code requirements in every state, county, city and town. You have to remove the politicized view on EV to see this is just the function of Govt - to set necessary regulations and minimium standards.

 

 

 

 


I was posing different questions in which the charging situation gets addressed, and perhaps I didn’t articulate it well.  As far as sides go. I am not on the side of big government dictating to the masses, and subsidizing peoples purchases, but that’s where we are at now. 
 

The market can dictate its own direction if it were allowed to, and the better products will win out.  I would love to see where the EV demand would be if it were not supply constrained as it is now. 

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On 9/22/2022 at 9:28 PM, tbone said:

I would love to see where the EV demand would be if it were not supply constrained as it is now. 

 

In Ford's case, it would have exceeded a 600,000 annual production run rate for its BEV already. However, the supply constraints including battery sourcing issues at Ford nowadays has the company predicting that it will be late 2023 when they hit that target.

 

cq5dam.web.881.495.jpeg

Edited by rperez817

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On 8/26/2022 at 10:42 AM, ice-capades said:

Washington and Massachusetts to follow California's gas car sales ban

States can opt into California Air Resources Board policies

https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/washington-massachusetts-californias-gas-car-sales-ban

 

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) that governs motor vehicle emissions for the state adopted new rules that will require 35% of the new cars sold in the state are electric or plug-in hybrids by 2026, with that percentage rising to 68% by 2030 and 100% by 2035.

 

California has a waiver from the federal government to set its own air quality rules, and other states are allowed to opt into its regulations, which are typically more stringent than the national standards.

 

Washington and Massachusetts have laws on the books that were written to trigger gas car sales bans if CARB passed one.

 

New York has now joined California, Washington, and Massachusetts in applying CARB ZEV mandates. New York state plans to adopt California 2035 EV rules | Automotive News (autonews.com)

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It looks like the US Federal Government/DOD are also looking at going BEV only by 2035 for its light fleet

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Elon Musk confirmed that Tesla's Class 8 Semi completed a 500 mile trip with a full load. Tesla Semi deliveries to customers start this Thursday. This should accelerate efforts by all manufacturers of Class 3 - 8 trucks and vans to have a 100% BEV or FCEV lineup by 2035 or earlier. Tesla Semi completes first 500-mile trip with a full load | Electrek

 

 

Tesla-Semi-megacharger-hero.jpg?w=2000&q

 

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Did they mention payload, or battery capacity required for 500-mile range?  Years ago speculation was as high as 800 kWh.

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24 minutes ago, Rick73 said:

Did they mention payload, or battery capacity required for 500-mile range? 

 

Not in the Electrek article or in Elon Musk's tweet. It's possible technical specs for Tesla Semi will be released this Thursday.

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13 hours ago, Rick73 said:

Did they mention battery capacity required for 500-mile range?  Years ago speculation was as high as 800 kWh.


I think the unofficial figure was “shitload”……..

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19 hours ago, rperez817 said:

Elon Musk confirmed that Tesla's Class 8 Semi completed a 500 mile trip with a full load. Tesla Semi deliveries to customers start this Thursday. This should accelerate efforts by all manufacturers of Class 3 - 8 trucks and vans to have a 100% BEV or FCEV lineup by 2035 or earlier. Tesla Semi completes first 500-mile trip with a full load | Electrek

 

 

Tesla-Semi-megacharger-hero.jpg?w=2000&q

 

 

There is no mention of how many times they had to recharge for that 500 miles drive. And no information on the terrain, elevation, or weather condition of that drive. Or how much of that 81,000 lbs is payload and how much is battery.

 

Let's wait to see the specs... 

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5 hours ago, bzcat said:

 

There is no mention of how many times they had to recharge for that 500 miles drive. And no information on the terrain, elevation, or weather condition of that drive. Or how much of that 81,000 lbs is payload and how much is battery.

 

Let's wait to see the specs... 

Also was 1,000lb over gvw. 

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On 9/23/2022 at 11:28 AM, tbone said:


I was posing different questions in which the charging situation gets addressed, and perhaps I didn’t articulate it well.  As far as sides go. I am not on the side of big government dictating to the masses, and subsidizing peoples purchases, but that’s where we are at now. 
 

The market can dictate its own direction if it were allowed to, and the better products will win out.  I would love to see where the EV demand would be if it were not supply constrained as it is now. 

I kinda disagree with this, a lot of the improvements to cars over the years was because they were legislated.
 

Early in the piece car makers couldn’t give a hoot about basic safety items like seat belts, collapsible steering columns or frontal crash zones. Los Angeles had a serious smog problem in the early seventies and the advent of emission controls went a long way towards correcting that. CAFE was another way to force manufacturers to improve their vehicles from 13 mpg to 26 mpg ….,and on it goes.

 

Would all of those improvements have  happened  eventually?

Who knows but I have a feeling that some may have happened anyway due to OPEC and fuel shortages in the 70s and early 80s

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22 hours ago, bzcat said:

There is no mention of how many times they had to recharge for that 500 miles drive.

 

A single charge is implied, though like you say we will have to wait for confirmation.

 

Some have estimated (speculated?) a target of just under 2 kWh per mile, which seems reasonable to me.  Energy consumption per mile roughly 8 times higher than Tesla 3 or new S (+/- 0.25 kWh per mile) seems consistent with fuel consumption between similar vehicles.

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On 11/28/2022 at 8:16 PM, Rick73 said:

Did they mention payload, or battery capacity required for 500-mile range?  Years ago speculation was as high as 800 kWh.


Saw this video this morning, a decent amount of assumptions but he is pretty good about going to both extremes with his math. We should know more tomorrow when the first ones are delivered
 

 

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On 11/30/2022 at 11:58 AM, Captainp4 said:


Saw this video this morning, a decent amount of assumptions but he is pretty good about going to both extremes with his math. We should know more tomorrow when the first ones are delivered
 

 

 

We know a little more, but not as much as many expected.

 

https://insideevs.com/news/624655/tesla-semi-delivery-start-event/

 

 

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