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rperez817

Ford October 2022 sales (U.S.)

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Ford Strengthens Position as America’s No. 2 EV Brand; All-New Super Duty Off to Hot Start – Orders Exceed 50,000 in Five Days; ‘23MY Retail Orders up 134%; F-Series Expands Lead as No. 1 Truck; Bronco Sales Climb 48% | Ford Media Center

 

Highlights.

  • Ford’s electric vehicle momentum continued in October with sales of its EV lineup up 120 percent over last year, about two times the rate of growth of the overall EV segment.
  • Ford’s October share of the electric vehicle segment was up 2.2 percentage points over last year with 8.9 percent share. Ford ranks No. 2 in EV sales behind only Tesla.
  • Ford’s electric vehicle portfolio has been conquesting at over 60 percent this year
  • F-150 Lightning continues as America’s best-selling electric truck with sales of 2,436 – its best monthly sales performance since its introduction this year
  • America’s best-selling electric van, E-Transit, climbed 71.5 percent compared to September on sales of 770 vans
  • Ford’s BlueCruise and Lincoln ActiveGlide technology now has more than 97,000 customers enrolled. It has accumulated more than 28 million hands-free miles with a network of over 130,000 Blue Zone miles across North America.

sales-ford-22-october.pdf

Edited by rperez817

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Glad to see Mustang sales up. Don't know if this is because customers don't like the looks of the '24 or just wanting to get in on the last of the S550 model.

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25 minutes ago, coupe3w said:

Glad to see Mustang sales up. Don't know if this is because customers don't like the looks of the '24 or just wanting to get in on the last of the S550 model.

Maybe they actually just have enough parts to build them :) 

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Imagine before the bailouts (not Ford) someone said to you that Ford would essentially be making cars to order, instead of having months of inventory sitting on dealer lots losing them money... 

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2 hours ago, justins said:

Imagine before the bailouts (not Ford) someone said to you that Ford would essentially be making cars to order, instead of having months of inventory sitting on dealer lots losing them money... 

Yes simply shocking that all the power buyers had with getting a good discount is now gone, the price is the price unless the dealer adds a mark up 

 

Under 60,000 F Series and Lightnings shows how ford is still struggling with completing truck builds.

Edited by jpd80

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3 hours ago, justins said:

Imagine before the bailouts (not Ford) someone said to you that Ford would essentially be making cars to order, instead of having months of inventory sitting on dealer lots losing them money..

 

It took a while, but thankfully that terrible business model for retail sales of new cars has gone by the wayside. Hopefully never to return.

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On 11/2/2022 at 6:31 PM, rperez817 said:

 

It took a while, but thankfully that terrible business model for retail sales of new cars has gone by the wayside. Hopefully never to return.

We are on an economic trajectory with inflation right now that can't sustain itself. Prices are rising much faster then wages and the Feds are trying to get it under control by raising interest rates aggressively. Government spending is a huge issue right now. Hopefully the election in a few days helps put a stop to it because continuing to print money and spend billions on so called "build back better" projects is driving more inflation.

 

The current business model might not be as sustainable in a recession which I believe is going to happen. The feds are going to crash everything to try and get inflation under control, but as long as we have a government that just can't stop spending what else can be done?

Edited by 2005Explorer

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50 minutes ago, 2005Explorer said:

The current business model might not be as sustainable in a recession which I believe is going to happen. 

 

Are you referring to the "build to order" business model Jim Farley at Ford embraced that emphasizes sold orders for retail car and light truck sales with minimal new vehicle stock at dealerships? That model is sustainable in both a recession as well as during periods of expansion, because it is designed to "ship product to the point of optimum demand", as John McElroy said on Autoline Daily.

 

If you're referring to "months of inventory sitting on dealer lots" model for new vehicle sales that justins mentioned, you are absolutely correct that it's not sustainable. Not just in a recession, but any economic environment, for all parties involved. John McElroy also talked about this.

 

Quote

Nothing much good can be said about the vast stocks of unsold vehicles on dealer lots:  billions of dollars of scarce capital are tied up, lot rot deteriorates quality, customers can’t find exactly what they want but delivery times for special order vehicles are interminable, and margins suffer as incentives are required to move the metal.

Edited by rperez817

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6 hours ago, 2005Explorer said:

We are on an economic trajectory with inflation right now that can't sustain itself. Prices are rising much faster then wages and the Feds are trying to get it under control by raising interest rates aggressively. Government spending is a huge issue right now. Hopefully the election in a few days helps put a stop to it because continuing to print money and spend billions on so called "build back better" projects is driving more inflation.

 

The current business model might not be as sustainable in a recession which I believe is going to happen. The feds are going to crash everything to try and get inflation under control, but as long as we have a government that just can't stop spending what else can be done?

Sorry, I’ve added this preamble after going on and on below..

the following “rant” is not intended as an attack on you, I appreciate exactly what you’re saying but things have changed massively behind the scenes, the rules for the rich are now very different to those for the poor..


He’s the thing though, all auto companies are behaving the same way now with respect to tight inventory and asking top dollar for all products. What in an election result or rising interest rates will change that?
 

While people complain about higher prices, those that can afford new vehicles to either buy or lease won’t be greatly affected by rate increases. Those feeling the pinch with discretionary funding will simply alter their buying choice to a less costly option.
 

Rate increases is the Fed belting the “have nots” over increases to compulsory spend items imposed on them by big business who are making record profits. Those people  have no choice but to bear the brunt of this, all while the “haves” with higher discretionary funds continue as normal and just pass on higher costs to others. It’s now two Americas because the Fed is clueless and attacking the wrong people.

 

 

There is now $16 trillion of new money created and locked within a three way cycle between the government, the Federal Reserve and the  Banks that will never be allowed to escape to the real world because any increased lending is a liability on the banks books, it’s almost imperative for them to lend it back to the government. 
 

Wall Street helped to create or at least wanted  this upper money cycle to protect the stock market, regardless of inflation or recession in the real world. It’s a crazy situation that makes a mockery of all the business models the  financial clock is now irrelevant. Qualitative easing was set up to advantage the government, Reserve and the banks by making  Repos and reverse Repos into a real strategy that furthers their interests.

Edited by jpd80

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The U.S. economy had been rolling along very well for 10 years with moderate growth, low inflation, and historically low interest rates until the fools in power decided it was a good idea to massively increase federal spending at a time when the economy was beginning to recover from the covid induced supply shortages. The massive green deal spending and the inflation reduction act (as if the way to reduce inflation was to increase spending by hundreds of billions of dollars) were the perfect way to insure inflation rates would increase and stick with us, which as jbd correctly points out, hits the poor disproportionately hard. Both of these spending disasters serve as examples of exactly what not to do. 

Edited by Trader 10

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jdb not Jen. 

Edited by Trader 10

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52 minutes ago, Trader 10 said:

The U.S. economy had been rolling along very well for 10 years with moderate growth, low inflation, and historically low interest rates until the fools in power decided it was a good idea to massively increase federal spending at a time when the economy was beginning to recover from the covid induced supply shortages. The massive green deal spending and the inflation reduction act (as if the way to reduce inflation was to increase spending by hundreds of billions of dollars) were the perfect way to insure inflation rates would increase and stick with us, which as jbd correctly points out, hits the poor disproportionately hard. Both of these spending disasters serve as examples of exactly what not to do. 

does the spending you talk about include the covid checks sent out in 2020 and early 2021?

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34 minutes ago, tarheels23 said:

does the spending you talk about include the covid checks sent out in 2020 and early 2021?

Yes it does. Those of course were necessary when people were sent home. The really harmful spending was the hundreds of billions to stimulate the economy and the green deal spending before the economy had a chance to recover from all the supply issues. 

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40 minutes ago, Trader 10 said:

Yes it does. Those of course were necessary when people were sent home. The really harmful spending was the hundreds of billions to stimulate the economy and the green deal spending before the economy had a chance to recover from all the supply issues. 


I like to say Trump started the inflation. Biden drastically increased it when he could have fairly easily kept it flat at least. None of this is good for anyone but the 1 percent. 

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2 hours ago, Trader 10 said:

The U.S. economy had been rolling along very well for 10 years with moderate growth, low inflation, and historically low interest rates until the fools in power decided it was a good idea to massively increase federal spending at a time when the economy was beginning to recover from the covid induced supply shortages. The massive green deal spending and the inflation reduction act (as if the way to reduce inflation was to increase spending by hundreds of billions of dollars) were the perfect way to insure inflation rates would increase and stick with us, which as jbd correctly points out, hits the poor disproportionately hard. Both of these spending disasters serve as examples of exactly what not to do. 

Except that the massive $6.5 trillion green deal was defeated and replaced by a much smaller spending on infrastructure that both sides agree was badly needed.

The inflation reduction act has many conditions built in, as in no immediate impact on inflation if ever…

 

Now imagine me trying to get off “the stage” and failing badly…….

Edited by jpd80

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The thing is that inflation is a world wide thing-not just in the US. It boils down to excess capital being given out by governments to stimulate the economy at a time of great unknown. Then add in people not traveling to work as much (I'm still on a hybrid schedule, which is great) but that also cuts down on other things like not spending money on gas/tolls to work, so people might have seen an increase income because they aren't driving as much, which drove up demand. We all know that the supply chains are still screwed up, but better now then they where last year (at least using shipping rates from around the world vs what they where to my house)

Apparently people are richer or stupider then I think they are with the way the house and car markets have been...maybe an economic slow down is what we need to get this everything back on keel. 

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Except inflation is linked to every rich multinational and transport business making booming profits by jacking up prices which the consumer cannot cover with wage increases. The fact that inflation is worldwide points to this not being the fault or mismanagement of governments like the USA or the EU, this is flat out yankee trader capitalism on a global scale. It’s clearly supply driven inflation, companies insisting on collecting income that was “lost during the pandemic years” a catch up if you will……

Edited by jpd80

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5 hours ago, jpd80 said:

Except inflation is linked to every rich multinational and transport business making booming profits by jacking up prices which the consumer cannot cover with wage increases. The fact that inflation is worldwide points to this not being the fault or mismanagement of governments like the USA or the EU, this is flat out yankee trader capitalism on a global scale. It’s clearly supply driven inflation, companies insisting on collecting income that was “lost during the pandemic years” a catch up if you will……


Why can’t it be both? It’s well documented that the more money you have in circulation, the less that money is worth. 

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Never mind, it’s off topic and folks don’t want to know about it

 

Edited by jpd80

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1 November 2022 inventory

 

Mustang ......................... 9,200
Bronco ......................... 12,300

Bronco Sport ................16,500

E-series van...................11,100

EcoSport………................. 2,200

Edge ............................... 7,900

Escape.......................... 28,200

Expedition ...................... 9,800

Explorer......................... 34,600

F series ...................... 149,700

Maverick......................... 9,500

Mustang Mach-E ........... 6,100

Ranger ........................... 6,600

Transit ......................... 22,700

Transit Connect……........ 2,300 
 


Aviator............................ 2,500

Corsair………………............ 6,100

Nautilus………................. 2,100

Navigator...................... 1,500

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Does that F series figure include the unfinished units? If not, that's got to be close to a 60 day supply, which seems inflated in the current circumstances?

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On 11/2/2022 at 7:31 PM, rperez817 said:

 

It took a while, but thankfully that terrible business model for retail sales of new cars has gone by the wayside. Hopefully never to return.

I understand your perspective, but there needs to be some kind of balance between the two in my opinion.  I’ve been waiting on my Raptor order for over a year. I now have the VIN but the Raptor is sitting on a holding lot somewhere, presumably waiting on parts. I understand we are living in somewhat extraordinary time s with the supply chain issues and that this is a specialty vehicle so it’s more unique, but I also know people who have waited a long time for standard orders that likely would have have bought one off the lot a lot had there been one. I believe there needs to be something on the lot for people to look at and those smaller inventories based on sales statistics or something.  Ford recently totted record numbers of orders, which is a self fulfilling record when there isn’t anything on the lot to buy.  Perhaps when the supply chain issue is resolved it won’t look like such a crap show, but right now the order process is not working well. And don’t get me started on the decontenting they are doing to try to build more vehicles.   It’s disgraceful at the prices they are charging nowadays.  

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the last time I bought a car was Thanksgiving 2012 C-Max I had to wait several days as they just came out and waited for the dealer to get what I wanted.  Before that I 😧bought off the lot.  I do not know how I feel about having to order and wait for it to be built.  I guess I'm just an old guy who will have to change.   😒

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image.thumb.png.093075bf1f2e789d48af6c8a24090103.png

 

Let's hope Ford can get these parts issues figured out soon.

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