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mackinaw

Farley looks Toward the Future

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Agreed, but I figured it might be of interest.  By Phoebe Howard too, the gal who wrote the DCT story.

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On 2/8/2020 at 12:30 PM, fuzzymoomoo said:

Did anyone else find very little substance in that piece? 

 

Yeah, it didn't say much of anything.

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On 2/8/2020 at 12:30 PM, fuzzymoomoo said:

Did anyone else find very little substance in that piece? 

 

The article had a lot of personal details about Mr. Farley, which were fun to read but may not be substance to most folks.

 

These details from the story are definitely substantive though. They are in the "Minute by Minute" and "One Stays, Another Goes" sections.

Quote

"Jim (Hackett) and I have been working really closely for three years," Farley said. "Both of us are very curious people. You can expect us to work very, very closely with each other." That means calls, memos, meetings, whatever it takes. Details are internal, Farley said. But execution will be measurable, he promised.

"We’re going to work in any way required to go faster," Farley said. "Jim and I are very close and we’re used to for many years now working minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day."
 

Fast doesn’t mean we’ll take shortcuts. It’s the opposite, actually.

 

 

Going faster is exactly what struggling Ford needs to do right now. Hopefully Farley and Hackett working together closely can accelerate the work to get Ford fit again.

Edited by rperez817

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More on Farley, from Automotive News.  

 

"A marketing specialist and cousin of the late actor and comedian Chris Farley, Jim Farley broadened his skills over the years with stints running Ford’s European operations and launching a comeback at Lincoln. Most recently, he’s been head of strategy and technology, cutting deals with Volkswagen Group and Rivian Automotive Inc. on electric and autonomous vehicles.  Along the way, Farley earned a reputation as a tough taskmaster, never afraid to speak his mind and throw a few elbows.  Farley’s tone may have softened since then, but his drive remains and Ford insiders are bracing for an extremely demanding new boss.  “Farley is very blunt, and I think Wall Street is actually going to like that because it’s such a contrast from Jim Hackett being very indirect,” said Whiston, who has the equivalent of a buy rating on Ford. “Farley has worked on his temperament a bit and tends to give more diplomatic answers now. The f-bombs are probably a thing of the past.”

 

https://www.autonews.com/executives/ford-board-leaves-embattled-ceo-little-room-error

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2 hours ago, fordmantpw said:

 

🤣

 

You gotta love a guy who's passionate enough to hurl an f-bomb every now and then!  😄 

Passionate? Or just an A-hole?

Edited by coupe3w

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2 hours ago, fordmantpw said:

 

🤣

 

You gotta love a guy who's passionate enough to hurl an f-bomb every now and then!  😄 


Like Kirby Smart who said “How ‘bout them F@#%&ing Dawgs” in a press conference.  
 

His wife made him apologize the next day.  

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12 minutes ago, coupe3w said:

Passionate? Or just an A-hole?

 

Best boss I ever had wasn't afraid to drop the F-bomb.  A bit of profanity here and there can really drive home a point.  

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19 minutes ago, coupe3w said:

Passionate? Or just an A-hole?

 

I don't know, ask my kids.  I've been known to drop the f-bomb at home, but rarely in public.  I'm more passionate about my kids than anything else in life.

 

But I do usually end up apologizing later...

Edited by fordmantpw

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2 minutes ago, mackinaw said:

 

Best boss I ever had wasn't afraid to drop the F-bomb.  A bit of profanity here and there can really drive home a point.  

No need for it in the work place. Very unprofessional. You can get your point across without profanity. And usually works better too.

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17 minutes ago, coupe3w said:

No need for it in the work place. Very unprofessional. You can get your point across without profanity. And usually works better too.

 

They're just words.  There's nothing inherently bad with swear words, it's all a matter of perception, and the intent of the word.

 

Strangely enough, we are listening to a video on this right now.  My wife and I help lead the RCIA classes for our parish, and language is a topic tonight.  It's all in the intention, and when not used for the intention of knocking people down, it's OK for occasional use.

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55 minutes ago, coupe3w said:

No need for it in the work place. Very unprofessional. You can get your point across without profanity. And usually works better too.

 

Baloney.  I dropped by a friend's work place last week which is mostly staffed by 20 and 30 year olds.  All drop the F-bomb.  Frequently.  Just the way it is today (and I won't even bring up the military, which has a long history of F-bomb use.  Know what SNAFU or FUBAR mean?).

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13 minutes ago, mackinaw said:

 

Baloney.  I dropped by a friend's work place last week which is mostly staffed by 20 and 30 year olds.  All drop the F-bomb.  Frequently.  Just the way it is today (and I won't even bring up the military, which has a long history of F-bomb use.  Know what SNAFU or FUBAR mean?).

I'm talking about management not the shop floor. And yes, I know what those acronyms are.

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Ford stock is at the same price it was in 1988. How did a company who is known for building a car screw up the launch of the 2020 Explorer so badly? Analysts are watching closely. 
 

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4 hours ago, rperez817 said:

...

Going faster is exactly what struggling Ford needs to do right now. Hopefully Farley and Hackett working together closely can accelerate the work to get Ford fit again.

 

Isn't 'going fast' a big part of what caused problems with the Explorer launch?

 

As much as I want to see the Bronco yesterday, we don't need more of that.

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On 2/10/2020 at 7:07 PM, Stampede.Offroad said:

Isn't 'going fast' a big part of what caused problems with the Explorer launch?

 

I think that was a result doing too many things and taking shortcuts as opposed to just 'going fast'. Joe Hinrichs said Ford "took on too much", referring to launching 2 all-new models (Explorer and Aviator) in an assembly plant ill suited for it.

Edited by rperez817

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Too dam bad lincoln does not have its own assembly line...also do not understand why mache is not being built on a niche line in michigan either.....hinrichs is right about chiraq plant...whole decision process from top down is too blame for that cluster

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On 2/10/2020 at 3:11 PM, fordmantpw said:

You gotta love a guy who's passionate enough to hurl an f-bomb every now and then!  😄 

 

There's this for the pro-potty mouth crowd..

image.png.8fc31ebc894880c40b830bfba362db02.png

 

...and for those that think profanity is not needed, there is this

image.png.5906f92126a4b8d645a6a0cd977aa3d4.png

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11 hours ago, rperez817 said:

 

I think that was a result doing too many things and taking shortcuts as opposed to just 'going fast'. Joe Hinrichs said Ford "took on too much", referring to launching 2 all-new models (Explorer and Aviator) in an assembly plant ill suited for it.

 

They should've just staggered the launch a bit.

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On 2/10/2020 at 4:57 PM, fordmantpw said:

 

They're just words.  There's nothing inherently bad with swear words, it's all a matter of perception, and the intent of the word.

.

 

Yes and no.  Profane words are stored and processed differently by our brains than regular language.

 

https://helix.northwestern.edu/blog/2013/02/special-place-brain-swearing

 

https://www.newsweek.com/2016/12/09/swearing-profanity-cognitive-science-language-benjamin-bergen-518390.html

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The boss can be demanding of more production or quality but does he/she really have any recourse given the UAW protections?  I mean does a shoddy worker really have to worry about getting canned?

If its anything like other unions that I have been part of, that answer is no. I've seen hacks, crooks, and slackers get full pass on their poor performance. This would apply to supervisors as well.

Edited by Patroy

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7 minutes ago, Patroy said:

The boss can be demanding of more production or quality but does he/she really have any recourse given the UAW protections?  I mean does a shoddy worker really have to worry about getting canned?

If its anything like other unions that I have been part of, that answer is no. I've seen hacks, crooks, and slackers get full pass on their poor performance. This would apply to supervisors as well.

 

Yes and no (IMO).  I have no doubt that poor/marginal workers are protected by the Union.  But there are many things the company has control over to minimize issues.  E.g. if you build a part so that it only goes in one way and locks into the proper position or you have a machine that puts it in the right position then you eliminate the potential for human error.

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1 hour ago, Patroy said:

The boss can be demanding of more production or quality but does he/she really have any recourse given the UAW protections?  I mean does a shoddy worker really have to worry about getting canned?

If its anything like other unions that I have been part of, that answer is no. I've seen hacks, crooks, and slackers get full pass on their poor performance. This would apply to supervisors as well.

 

1 hour ago, akirby said:

 

Yes and no (IMO).  I have no doubt that poor/marginal workers are protected by the Union.  But there are many things the company has control over to minimize issues.  E.g. if you build a part so that it only goes in one way and locks into the proper position or you have a machine that puts it in the right position then you eliminate the potential for human error.


The union does get involved with quality issues. Every department has a UAW quality rep that gets called on when issues arise and it's part of their job to help find the source and come up with a resolution. These jobs are made pretty foolproof so it's kinda rare that it's human error. More often than not it's fixable right on the spot. 

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