Jump to content

None






silvrsvt

Mustang Shelby GT350 Power offically at 526HP/420ft/lb

Recommended Posts

How about use it in that mythical longitudinal AWD SUV previously imagined? Wasn't there some talk of a Lincoln Range Rover competitor. With enough gears in the transmission and maybe a cam change to pump up the low end a little maybe it would work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@jvpbs...my guess is the eco boost would be more likely to be utilized in that configuration....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@jvpbs...my guess is the eco boost would be more likely to be utilized in that configuration....

 

I'd think an EB would be more likely too. But if were looking for another place to put the 5.2, a FPC V8 would certainly be a selling point if Lincoln were going to sell something that could be approching 6 figures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fuzzy...put that engine and recreate the Lightning...I bet that would change....Ford did relase there were going to be 12 performance vehicles released, correct?....anyone keeping count?...

Yeah, I was joking. I couldn't remember the keyword for the stir the pot emoticon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I was joking. I couldn't remember the keyword for the stir the pot emoticon

It's : stirpot : without spaces between the word and colons

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or a supercharged Coyote......

 

I sure hope Ford goes with EB turbos, and does it the right way. Leave the mechanical superchargers to GM and Jaguar, IMHO. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed, shes plumbed and ready to go...and didn't they patent eco-BEAST?....

Edited by Deanh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting conversation here and speculation regarding GT350 production volume, pricing, etc. Deanh knows the business very well and I think we share similar views on many if not nearly all the Forum topics that we participate in. I just tried searching the FMCDealer.com portal for specific information regarding GT350 allocation but as Deanh can testify, the search function at FMCDealer.com is often an effort in futility!

 

The Shelby program is not treated as a separate franchise agreement as it was years ago. Every Dealer can participate but they must meet the program certification criteria including at least one Shelby certified sales representative plus specific service department requirements. The dealer enrollment covers a two year period (2 Model Years) plus an annual fee to participate which provides product brochures, marketing materials, etc.

 

Dealers who complete the certification process will be eligible for the following allocation:

  • One unit for any Dealer that enrolls in the program and completes the certification requirements.
  • Remaining production will be based on Retail Sales Share of Nation (Mustang) formula. This will be determined once Dealer certification has been completed.

The above is a slight change from the Shelby allocation program for recent years but is nothing that will materially change Shelby allocation and/or distribution.

 

Using the Ford Vehicle Locator tool, it shows that there are actually 3,118 Ford Dealers in the USA. I don't think that Deanh is far off using an average of 2.5 vehicles per Dealer based on his estimate of there being roughly 2,000 Ford Dealers. I think that it's realistic to estimate Shelby GT350 production of about 5,000 vehicles per year. With each participating Dealer getting (1) GT350 that would mean about 2,000 additional units to take care of the high volume market areas, etc. with a small number for additional allocation.

 

There are a lot of Shelby customers that want a specific vehicle configuration (Color/Trim/Options) that are willing to search and/or travel a distance to get the vehicle they desire. In other cases, there are a lot of Dealers in smaller or more rural markets that will get cars but not be in a market that has much demand. Those Dealers often keep their Shelby's for a time and then are willing to sell them to other Dealers at MSRP and still make a healthy profit on the transaction. The receiving Dealer then marks up the price accordingly. I know from my own experience as a few years ago our store bought a Shelby GT500 from a Dealer in Wisconsin for one of our customers here in CT.

 

Hope this information helps the conversation here and answers some questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Ford is going to use the 5.2 in anything else, it should be a Lincoln. I'm not sure what, but not the Navigator.

 

Such a move would show that Ford is serious about Lincoln as a brand without costing big bucks since the engine already exists. And Lincoln would get something really special relative to its competitors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm... 5.2L V8 with flat-plane crank...

 

One already arriving in the GT350...

 

But hmm... what to do... what to do...

 

 

 

Answer: Lincoln Mark IX (pronounced "Mark Nine")

 

 

/thread

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But nobody buys regular cabs anymore!

They might buy one turned into a Bronco...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But nobody buys regular cabs anymore!

 

 

They might buy one turned into a Bronco...

 

But, then it wouldn't be a regular cab anymore......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They might buy one turned into a Bronco...

One is right. Maybe two.

 

Ask yoda how FJ sales are. What percentage of Wrangler sales are Unlimiteds?

 

May as well make Lincoln a modern 70s era luxo barge, and a new Ford wagon as well.

 

Ford is not GM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One is right. Maybe two.

 

Ask yoda how FJ sales are. What percentage of Wrangler sales are Unlimiteds?

 

May as well make Lincoln a modern 70s era luxo barge, and a new Ford wagon as well.

 

Ford is not GM.

FJ was discontinued (or maybe that was your point).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May as well make Lincoln a modern 70s era luxo barge

 

Um........

 

0.jpg

010.jpg

 

What blows my mind about all this is that the public reaction to the unabashed cossetting of the Continental has been enormous. It seems like an idea whose time has come. Again.

 

This new Continental? It's a modern-day luxo barge. Granted, it's going to ride so much better than the 70s Marks, and there's a lot more genuine luxury in the new Continental, but this is still, unquestionably, a vehicle that is intended to pamper first, and perform second.

Edited by RichardJensen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A high revving GT 350 and a Lincoln luxury barge?

 

Sure why not, diversity is good for business...

Edited by jpd80

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Um........

 

0.jpg

010.jpg

 

What blows my mind about all this is that the public reaction to the unabashed cossetting of the Continental has been enormous. It seems like an idea whose time has come. Again.

 

This new Continental? It's a modern-day luxo barge. Granted, it's going to ride so much better than the 70s Marks, and there's a lot more genuine luxury in the new Continental, but this is still, unquestionably, a vehicle that is intended to pamper first, and perform second.

 

I also actually really like the blue interior too for what it's worth haha.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those laptop table things on the seat backs remind me so, so, so, so very much of my parents' suitcases when I was a little kid:

 

il_570xN.335430849.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's always been a market for a big huge comfy car full of bells and whistles. It's something that's uniquely American and something BMW or Lexus isn't going to be able to imitate.

 

Like it or not, the late Town Car served this market well and that's who Lincoln legacy customer base is. Since Cadillac and Lincoln abandoned it, there really haven't been any available in the market. If it's done right, the new Continental could be a big success. I'm just not so sure about the platform though. Everything even remotely related to D3 has been underwhelming when it comes to rear seat space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That car is not remotely related to D3.

 

And, having been in several first gen. D3 products, as well as the second row of the Flex, I can tell you that relating the shortcomings of Taurus & MKS second row accommodations to the PLATFORM are wrong. Really wrong.

Edited by RichardJensen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll admit I know little about what's underneath the new Continental so I hope you're right. I'll also admit you may very well be right about the Taurus, Flex, and MKS. Its just that the platform is the only excuse that makes sense for the tight back seats in those things. If it's not limited by the platform, why didn't Ford give it a bigger back seat? I mean they're supposed to full-size - the rear seat matters in that class.

Edited by Sevensecondsuv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also I'm not sure anything could ride nicer than a 70s luxo-barge Lincoln. It was basically like floating down the road in a cloud. Perhaps you meant 'handle' better. I could go along with that statement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll admit I know little about what's underneath the new Continental so I hope you're right. I'll also admit you may very well be right about the Taurus, Flex, and MKS. Its just that the platform is the only excuse that makes sense for the tight back seats in those things. If it's not limited by the platform, why didn't Ford give it a bigger back seat? I mean they're supposed to full-size - the rear seat matters in that class.

 

If you haven't been in the back seat of a Five Hundred or the second row of a Flex, you have no idea what you're talking about. I have. The problem isn't the platform it's the roofline of the Taurus/MKS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was basically like floating down the road in a cloud. Perhaps you meant 'handle' better. I could go along with that statement.

 

Yeah. And then you went over an expansion joint and spent the next hundred yards fighting off sea-sickness. And before you reply, my folks had a '72 Galaxie and an '80 LTD. I know all about how well those floaty suspensions handled abrupt surface changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×